St AndrewsCounty Dublin

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aka Hoggen Green in the 18th Century
aka Hoggen Green in the 18th Century

Faiche an Choláiste aka College Green was formerly known as Hoggen Green until 1666. This photo is a view of the north side of this three-sided plaza, with Parliament House aka the Bank of Ireland in view. Trinity College Dublin (established in 1592) stands on its east side. This plaza has long been a major political assembly point in Dublin.  

This plaza was originally the burial site of Dublin’s Viking warriors  and is thought to have contained the remains of some of the Norse kings of Dublin.  Hoggen came from the Old Norse word haugr (lit. mound, or barrow)  and Hoggen Green consisted of several burial mounds. The Norse "Thing-mót" (an assembly and meeting-place) could still be seen near here well into the 17th century.  

Hoggen Green (the name given to it by the English) was one of Dublin’s three main medieval commonages. Hoggen gave its name to the convent of St Mary de Hogges (a major landowner in the area until the Reformation) which stood roughly where Parliament House (as seen in this photo) sits now. By the time this photo was taken, Parliament House had been occupied by the Bank of Ireland for more than a century.

Parliament House is the world's first purpose-built two-chamber parliament house. From 1729 to 1800 it was home to the Parliament of Ireland. (The Act of Union which came into effect on January 1st 1801 transferred the Irish peers to London).  In 1803, the building was bought by the fledgeling the Bank of Ireland and has remained so to this day. 

 

[Post by Rua Mac Diarmada]

References

The architecture of College Green Ireland VIEW SOURCE

Communities Associated with this Building