Mount Browne

KillukinCounty Roscommon

Share This:

Mount Browne was Grogian house in the townland of Falsk (just west of Strokestown on the road to Tulsk). In 1837, this townland was recorded in the Ordnance Survey as "Falska now Mount Browne".

  • Griffith's Valuation of 1857 reveals that Mount Browne was the property of James G. Plunkett, valued at £25 and let to George Browne the occupier. Plunkett was an absentee landlord who lived in Lancashire and owned The Northern Press and Liverpool General Advertiser in the 1860s.  In June 1857, the sale rental of the Gunning Plunkett estate stated that Mount Browne was held by a fee farm grant from Jane Plunkett, mother and guardian of the owner, to George Browne, dated 30 Oct 1852. 

In the 18th century, the occupying tenant was George Browne Esq. J.P. who was a descendant of John Browne 1st Earl of Altamont (and a brother of Arthur Browne of Newtown, parish of Oran). George Browne was a barrister at law and also engaged in horse-breeding. In May 1836, George Browne Esq. advertised horses for sale at "Mountbrowne near Strokestown" in the Roscommon Journal. In 1838, he attended a Railway Commission meeting in Ballinasloe where he proposed the first resolution, which was as follows: 

  • "That we are of opinion that the commerce and agriculture of the country would be greatly promoted by judiciously selected lines of railroads towards the west of Ireland, which lead to the employment of the people, and open the communication with capacious harbors on the western coast of the province of Connaught.” Mr. Browne said that the resolution which had the honour of submitting was one that would meet the approval not only of every man in the west of Ireland but of all who had the welfare of their country at heart. It was, therefore, unnecessary that he should say one word more to enforce the necessity of its adoption. Every measure that gave employment to the people and opened the resources of the country, must lead to increase their prosperity. This was seconded by Mr. Evans, and passed with acclamation. 
  • In 1840, George Browne Esq. J.P. was among those of Roscommon's Nobility & Gentry who opposed the parliamentary bill set to further disenfranchise £10 freeholders. 
  • In January 1847, George Browne Esq. of Mountbrowne applied to the Voter's Register stating he was a £50 freeholder of lands at of "Falsk otherwise Mount Browne, Barony of Roscommon". In 1853, he bought 3 townlands in the parish of Kiltrustan (barony and county of Roscommon) from the sale of Gilbert Conry's estate. Griffith's Valuation of 1857 reveals that Mount Browne was the property of James G. Plunkett, valued at £25 and let to George Browne the occupier. Plunkett was an absentee landlord who lived in Lancashire and owned The Northern Press and Liverpool General Advertiser in the 1860s.  In June 1857, the sale rental of the Gunning Plunkett estate stated that Mount Browne was held by a fee farm grant from Jane Plunkett, mother and guardian of the owner, to George Browne, dated 30 Oct 1852. 

In August 1847, Mount-Browne made front-page news in the Roscommon Journal when George Browne Esq. was the defendant in a case for libel. Plaintiff William Mulloy Esq. of Oakport, (also a barrister). accused Browne of reporting Mulloy to be a "liar and a blackhguard", guilty of slander and perjury in a letter to the Roscommon Journal (published in Nov. 1845). This case "had excited greater attention than any that had been tried at our Assizes for some years past, both gentlemen being Barristers at law" Damages of three thousand pounds were being sought. That Browne had specially retained Issac Butt Esq. Q.C. in his defence, saw the courtroom "crowded to suffocation". Mr Butt's opening argument filled so many pages it required a supplement in the Roscommon Journal. 

In 1894 and 1906, Mount Browne was occupied by the representatives of Arthur Browne, George's third son, who had owned an estate of 455 acres at Mount Browne in the 1870s.

Type of buiding:

House

Communities Associated with this Building