Drum ATHLONE in the 1830s

1837
Share This:
Edit

A snapshot of pre-famine local history, as described in the "Topographical Dictionary of Ireland" by Samuel Lewis, 1837. (The information collected here was submitted by members of the local gentry and clergy of the time).

DRUM, or EDARDDRUIM, a parish, in the barony of ATHLONE, county of ROSCOMMON, and province of CONNAUGHT, 4 miles (S. W.) from Athlone, on the river Shannon, and on the road to Ballinasloe ; containing 4957 inhabitants.

An abbey was founded here by St. Diradius, or Deoradius, brother of St. Canoe, about the close of the fifth century: and in the retreat of the army of St. Ruth from Aughrim, this is thought to have been the spot where a battle was fought. The parish contains 8965 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act: the land, in general very poor, is chiefly under tillage; there is still a considerable quantity of bog, though much has been reclaimed.

The seats are

  • Thomastown Park, the residence of Edmund H. Naghten, Esq.;
  • Ardkenam of Edw. Naghten, Esq. ;
  • Johnstown, of J. Dillon, Esq., now occupied by Mr. Kelly;
  • Summer Hill, of J. Gaynor Esq. ; and
  • White House, of Mrs. Reilly.

There is a constabulary police station at Cranough.

It is in the diocese of Tuam; the rectory is partly impropriate in the Incorporated Society; the vicarage is episcopally united to that of Moore. The tithes amount to £180, one-half payable to the impropriators, and the other to the vicar. There is no church.

In the Roman Catholic divisions, the parish forms part of the union or district of St. Peter's, Athlone, in the diocese of Elphin: the chapel is in the old churchyard, in which are the ruins of a chapel, which was dedicated to St. Mary, and is said to have been erected by one of the O'Naghtens, in 550.

About 200 children are taught in four private schools.

Communities Associated with this Timeline