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Welcome cousin my great great grandfather was James Keogh brother to Michael Keogh James Imagated to Door county Wisconsin around the 1848 With wife Mary (Moore) Keogh and 5 Sons Edward , Mike , James , Luke ,  and John Keogh. Luke was My great grand father By his youngest son Patric Henery aliai ( Harry ) Keogh who Setteled In North eastern Washinton State around 1910 Duncan Keogh

Wednesday 2nd September 2020, 06:06PM

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  • Dear Duncan:

    Many thanks for your post to the Ireland Reaching Out message board.  Would you have any more information about the Keoghs who emigrated in 1848?  What were their ages?  

    In looking on the Roots Ireland database, I see a John Keogh baptised 20 June 1841 to  a James Keogh and a Mary Moore.  The parish is Blanchardstown in County Dublin.  I do not see any reference to other children's baptisms for this couple, but you might find them if you look at the Blanchardstown parish registers on the National Library of Ireland website at this link:  https://registers.nli.ie/parishes/0466

    For ease of reference, here is the link to the page with John Keogh's baptism record which shows that the sponsors were:  Patrick Keogh and Anne Moore.

    https://registers.nli.ie/registers/vtls000633357#page/116/mode/1up  The entry is at the left hand side of the page about mid-way down.  You will see that the address was noted as the "Low Road".  

    If you have any further information, please add it to this post.

    All the best,

     

    Jane

    Jane Halloran Ryan

    Friday 4th September 2020, 03:12PM
  • Thank you Jane:  

     

    Saturday 5th September 2020, 02:09PM
  • James and Mary(Moore) Keogh Born 1841 Dublin Ire. Died 1904 Forestvile Wi.USA. Edward keogh Born 1844 Dublin Ire. Died 1935 Wi. 1935 Luke Keogh Born county Dublin 1848 died 1927 Forestvile Wi. USA ( note my Great grand Father) Thomas Keogh born 1848 county Dublin Ire. ( death unknown) Possible twin to Luke ? Note it is posible Thomas didnt survive the Passage ? Do know James worked in the Toronto area to pay off passage and build a grub stake before comming over the Great Lakes to USA. Duncan Keogh

    Saturday 5th September 2020, 05:01PM
  • Hi Duncan:

    Thanks for that reply.  It sounds like the record that I gave to you is the right one.  If that is the case, it is Dublin records that you will be interested in.  I'm going to share this post with a few of our Dublin volunteers who may be able to add further guidance to your research.

    Stay safe and well.

     

    All the best,

    Jane

    Jane Halloran Ryan

    Monday 7th September 2020, 08:52AM
  • A little history about the Keogh family. (Grandma Ella's grandparents). Found this on a Door County historical website.

    ***********

    The early settlement of Forestville was largely due to an accident. One day in May, 1855, a steamboat stopped at Manitowoc to deliver a little freight. It was the later ill-fated Lady Elgin, plying between Buffalo and Chicago. Among the passengers were four young Irishmen bound for Chicago and Galena, Ill. While the boat was unloading its freight these men took a stroll on the shore to see the sights of the little village. They were James Keogh, Sr., and John, Richard and Matthew Perry. Wandering a little too far they were suddenly alarmed to see the Lady Elgin backing away from the pier. They rushed down to get aboard but too late. The steamer had gotten under headway with Mrs. Keogh and her babies frantically besieging the captain to put back and get her husband. However, the fare was paid and the lordly captain merely shrugged his shoulders.

    While these four men were standing on the pier debating their dilemma with many bristling Irish adjectives for the arrogant captain they were approached by an elderly man of imposing appearance who gave his name as "Major" McCormick.

    After he had listened to their tale of woe for awhile he suddenly astonished them by saying: "Boys, you ought to be happy instead of grumbling. You were never in better luck than when that boat left you. Instead of going to Galena and slaving in the lead mines for $1 a day, you come with me and I will show you the best place in the West, where there are all kinds of chances of making money."

    Dubiously they asked him where he hailed from. "I am from a new town up in Door County about forty miles north of here," he said. "I have a sawmill, a hotel and a town site there. The timber is grand and the soil is excellent. We have a fine waterfall to give us cheap power and we intend to start a blast furnace. We have discovered a deposit of choice marble near by. All we need to make a first class city is men and we are willing to pay them better wages than anywhere else in America. You come with me and you will get the right start."

    Keogh, who was thinking of his wife, carried off to a strange city without money, was not interested. However, the major explained that no boat would leave for Chicago for a week and they would have plenty of time to go with him. It would cost them nothing.

    Persuaded by the major's eloquence they finally decided to visit his Eldorado while waiting for the Chicago boat. McCormick had a Mackinac boat and they made their way to Algoma (then called Ahnapee) in this. From this point they rowed and poled their way up the little river for about ten miles. When they got up to the major's town site, however, they were disappointed. His sawmill did not exist, his hotel was only a wretched little hut, the rushing waterfall, which was to drive he wheels of industry in the new city was only a small rapids. The marble deposit, as they later discovered, was merely a layer of smooth limestone. The timber, however, was there, a huge forest shutting them in on every side. For a while they felt like beating up the wily major for having lured them into such a wilderness. But he was profuse with his explanations and so lavish with his promises of big pay, and the big forest itself appealed to them so much that they not only forgave him but decided to stay there, buy land and work for McCormick.

    This decided upon James Keogh went to Chicago and returned with his wife and at once took land and settled in Forestville. So also did John, Richard and Matthew Perry. John Perry after a little moved to California. A fourth brother, Samuel, also took land in Forestville in the later '50s but soon moved to Ahnapee where he became a prominent merchant and manufacturer.

    A little history about the Keogh family. (Grandma Ella's grandparents). Found this on a Door County historical website.

    ***********

    The early settlement of Forestville was largely due to an accident. One day in May, 1855, a steamboat stopped at Manitowoc to deliver a little freight. It was the later ill-fated Lady Elgin, plying between Buffalo and Chicago. Among the passengers were four young Irishmen bound for Chicago and Galena, Ill. While the boat was unloading its freight these men took a stroll on the shore to see the sights of the little village. They were James Keogh, Sr., and John, Richard and Matthew Perry. Wandering a little too far they were suddenly alarmed to see the Lady Elgin backing away from the pier. They rushed down to get aboard but too late. The steamer had gotten under headway with Mrs. Keogh and her babies frantically besieging the captain to put back and get her husband. However, the fare was paid and the lordly captain merely shrugged his shoulders.

    While these four men were standing on the pier debating their dilemma with many bristling Irish adjectives for the arrogant captain they were approached by an elderly man of imposing appearance who gave his name as "Major" McCormick.

    After he had listened to their tale of woe for awhile he suddenly astonished them by saying: "Boys, you ought to be happy instead of grumbling. You were never in better luck than when that boat left you. Instead of going to Galena and slaving in the lead mines for $1 a day, you come with me and I will show you the best place in the West, where there are all kinds of chances of making money."

    Dubiously they asked him where he hailed from. "I am from a new town up in Door County about forty miles north of here," he said. "I have a sawmill, a hotel and a town site there. The timber is grand and the soil is excellent. We have a fine waterfall to give us cheap power and we intend to start a blast furnace. We have discovered a deposit of choice marble near by. All we need to make a first class city is men and we are willing to pay them better wages than anywhere else in America. You come with me and you will get the right start."

    Keogh, who was thinking of his wife, carried off to a strange city without money, was not interested. However, the major explained that no boat would leave for Chicago for a week and they would have plenty of time to go with him. It would cost them nothing.

    Persuaded by the major's eloquence they finally decided to visit his Eldorado while waiting for the Chicago boat. McCormick had a Mackinac boat and they made their way to Algoma (then called Ahnapee) in this. From this point they rowed and poled their way up the little river for about ten miles. When they got up to the major's town site, however, they were disappointed. His sawmill did not exist, his hotel was only a wretched little hut, the rushing waterfall, which was to drive he wheels of industry in the new city was only a small rapids. The marble deposit, as they later discovered, was merely a layer of smooth limestone. The timber, however, was there, a huge forest shutting them in on every side. For a while they felt like beating up the wily major for having lured them into such a wilderness. But he was profuse with his explanations and so lavish with his promises of big pay, and the big forest itself appealed to them so much that they not only forgave him but decided to stay there, buy land and work for McCormick.

    This decided upon James Keogh went to Chicago and returned with his wife and at once took land and settled in Forestville. So also did John, Richard and Matthew Perry. John Perry after a little moved to California. A fourth brother, Samuel, also took land in Forestville in the later '50s but soon moved to Ahnapee where he became a prominent merchant and manufacturer.

    Nancy

    Saturday 30th October 2021, 04:07PM
  • Here is a map of the Forestville, Wisconsin farms.

    Luke Keogh was my great grandfather.  Ella, Luke's daughter married Charles Zastrow, my grandmother and grandfather.  My father, Harry Zastrow was the oldest of their five children. Some of Ella's brothers moved to Usk, Washington and were lumberjacks. I have more info and photos.

    Nancy

    Saturday 30th October 2021, 04:18PM

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