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Hi,

I am researching my great great grandfather, Thomas Cosgrove. He was a dentist in Dublin from the late 1860s until c. 1887 when he died. He was born in London in 1844, so would have been about 44/45 when he died. I am not certain when he died but he is recorded in Thoms directory living in Dublin in 1887. However, by 1891 his wife is living in London and listed as a widow. I have been able to locate birth/baptism certificates for his children, but can't find his death certificate. Can anyone advise, please?
Kind regards,
H

HCC

Monday 11th January 2021, 08:58PM

Message Board Replies

  • Hi,

    See this link to the death of a Thomas Cosgrove in Dublin in 1891, found at the free Irish Genealogy website. It may mean s9mething to you.

    https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/images/deaths_retur...

    Best wishes, Kieran Jordan

    Kieran Jordan, IrelandXO Volunteer ☘

    Monday 11th January 2021, 10:16PM
  • Thank you for your help. Unfortunately it isn't my gg grandfather. I realised I didn't include my great great grandmother's name which is Annie Elizabeth.
    I wondered whether there were any gaps in records for the time period in Dublin.

    Kind regards,

    H

    HCC

    Wednesday 13th January 2021, 11:57AM
  • Hi,

    No, I don't think there were any gaps, a such. Some people just didn't register deaths, or biths. Marriages were generally registered by the church. For example, I have a mortuary card for my gggrandmother  who died in 1899, but there is no record of her death, and my grandfather gopt a letter from the authorities reminding him to register my fathers birth or he would be fined. So I think any 'gaps' would be to do with people's laxity.

    Best wishes, Kieran

    Kieran Jordan, IrelandXO Volunteer ☘

    Wednesday 13th January 2021, 05:03PM
  • Thanks Kieran. That is really interesting. The family story is that Thomas' dental practice failed due to a cholera outbreak and he committed suicide. Would that explain it? Alternatively I wondered if he was committed to an asylum. Are mortuary cards publically accessible or is this something you had within your family? Thanks for your help.

    HCC

    Sunday 17th January 2021, 05:03PM
  • Hi,

    The mortuary card was in the family.

    You could try the asylums in the area, they may have records of entrants. If it was suicide I would expect there was an inquest and then there should be a report and a record. You could check with the coronors office but I would be surprised if they didn't report it. Would he have died in England? I searched the newspapers at that time and could find nothing.

    Best wishes, Kieran

    Kieran Jordan, IrelandXO Volunteer ☘

    Monday 18th January 2021, 08:59PM